FSTAB + XFS file system

# FSTAB

The fstab (/etc/fstab) (or file systems table) file is a system configuration file commonly found on Unix systems. It is part of the util-linux package. The fstab file typically lists all available disks and disk partitions, and indicates how they are to be initialized or otherwise integrated into the overall system's file system. fstab is still used for basic system configuration, notably of a system's main hard drive and startup file system, but for other uses has been superseded in recent years by automatic mounting.
The fstab file is most commonly used by the mount command, which reads the fstab file to determine which options should be used when mounting the specified device. It is the duty of the system administrator to properly create and maintain this file.

XFS
XFS is a high-performance journaling file system created by Silicon Graphics, Inc. It is the default file system in IRIX releases 5.3 and onwards and later ported to the Linux kernel. XFS is particularly proficient at parallel IO due to its allocation group based design. This enables extreme scalability of IO threads, filesystem bandwidth, file and filesystem size when spanning multiple storage devices. A typical XFS user site, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division takes advantage of these capabilities, deploying two 300+ terabyte XFS filesystems on two SGI Altix archival storage servers, each direct attached to multiple fiber channel disk arrays.[1]

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